Tag: education

Awareness on the Risk of Transmission of Infectious Diseases in Dentistry

Health care providers are at risk for infection with bloodborne pathogens, including hepatitis B virus, human immunodeficiency virus, and hepatitis C virus. Recommended infection control practices are applicable to all settings in which dental treatment is provided. Dentists remain at low risk for occupationally acquired human immunodeficiency virus. Dental health care workers, through occupational exposure, may have a 10 times greater risk of becoming a chronic hepatitis B carrier than the average citizen. Tuberculosis is caused by Mycobacterium tuberculosis. In general, persons suspected of having pulmonary or laryngeal tuberculosis should be considered infectious if they are coughing, are undergoing cough-inducing or aerosol-generating procedures, or have sputum smears positive for acid-fast bacilli. Although the possibility of transmission of bloodborne infections from dental health care workers to patients is considered to be small, precise risks have not been quantified by carefully designed epidemiologic studies. Emphasis should be placed on consistent adherence to recommended infection control strategies, including the use of protective barriers and appropriate methods of sterilization or disinfection. Each dental facility should develop a written protocol for instrument reprocessing, operatory cleanup, and management of injuries. Such efforts may lead to the development of safer and more effective medical devices, work practices, and personal protective equipment.

https://www.researchgate.net/publication/11357793_Risk_and_prevention_of_transmission_of_infectious_diseases_in_dentistry

What’s your Art Process?

The art process, the thing that sets us apart from one another in the art community. We each have our own unique ways of achieving our goals. In this case, an artwork, a masterpiece, or even just a random sketch. Oftentimes, we easily find an effective process, that yields consistent results. We all crave for that “perfect” art process, that we can use throughout our art career.
A sample art process by Rene Gorecki
Example art process of “Collar” by Rene Gorecki
As a self-taught digital artist with no formal training, I have to change my process from time to time. I tell you, it’s not something you discover immediately, In fact, my current approach is not yet very efficient. In this post, I’ll talk about the evolution of my style.

Lineart to Base Color art process

Like a lot of artists, my inspiration came from anime and cartoons. I also never used coloring materials after a couple of years.  As a result, it was easier for me to do the lineart to the base color technique.
A sample process by RandomEpicAlex from DeviantArt
Example art process by RandomEpicAlex
However, this style gave me a lot of problems. I often end up with 10+ layers, (I use Photoshop CC btw.) that end up lagging my computer. So after studying other artists’ works, I decided that this was not for me.

The “Painterly” process

There was a short period, where I tried the “painterly” approach. This meant, that I had to use lineart to a minimum, and focus on blotting the colors as soon as possible.
My "painterly" process
‘No Lineart Photo Study” by Astralberry (Me)
Though faster to do, I found myself struggling to create livelier artworks with this technique. I guess I didn’t have enough watercolor experience to pull this off.

The Mixed style process

I realized that I needed lineart to help me create more anatomically correct pieces. So I combined the two techniques.
A mixed painterly art process by me
‘The Aviator’ by Astralberry (me)
Finally, I am getting more efficient. This remained my style for a while. However, after a few months, I realized that I was struggling with colors and values. I also had issues with the backgrounds and overall mood of my works.

The Grayscale Approach

To fix this problem. I started my paintings in grayscale. This helped me establish my values from the start. It also made it easier for me to fix the image’s anatomy, and shape earlier. As well as play with many color variations. I was beginning to have fun! (I wasn’t able to save the lineart for this piece.)
Grayscale approach by me
“Lights, a Study” by Astralberry (me)
This is my technique to date. Though, like everything else, There are still issues with it. I find that it’s too time-consuming. Because I’d have to paint the image three times! (grayscale > colored > final retouches) The third time, because of the common problem with the grayscale approach; Upon adding color, it would always appear muddy. A lot of retouching would need to be done, to counter this.
One of my latest artworks
“Autumn Summer” by Astralberry
In Conclusion, we just have to learn how to be patient with our craft. It takes a lot of time to build the “perfect” technique. Make a lot of drafts. Learn from the pros, by asking them, or watching their videos, etc. You can check out this link for some awesome techniques. How about you, what is your current art process?